7 Steps to Free Your Child From Anxiety

Therese J. Borchard

freeing your childI had my share of panic attacks as a kid.

Especially over schoolwork.

I was dead sure, absolutely positive, that I would never ever be able to complete the assignment, pass the test, and get forwarded to the next grade. Because I was so stupid, I thought, I would have to repeat fifth grade until I was 20 years old, at which time everyone would mistake me for my classmates’ mom and I would have to make all my friends’ lunches.

I believe everyone is born with an “I can” voice and an “I can’t” voice. Some folks emerge from their mother’s wombs with a fervent confidence that follows them to their grave. They never ever question their ability to make friends, find a spouse, or get a job. Others will second-guess themselves on everything from learning when to poo in the potty to picking out a nursing home for…

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The Ride of Moods

Twisting, turning, racing up and down
Like a ride that never stops
I don’t recall having bought the ticket
No matter, there’s no getting off

The blue ones are for calming me down
The green ones to pick me up
The pink ones because I just can’t sleep
There’s more if that’s not enough

This thing that effects me wherever I am
I pray it doesn’t show
This private Hell that cripples my mind
No chance of letting me go
Sometimes I gather all of my colors
Especially the white
Combined I know they’ll kill the noise
I’ve grown weary of the fight

But then I stop and look around
Such blessings that are mine
My man, my kids, my future hope
They pull me back in line

Although I’m not like I used to be
So many years ago
I’m learning to live with who I’ve become
This woman I’m getting to know

>Snack Attack: A New Twist on Oatmeal Cookies

Keira Lennox

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Husband and I don’t share too many vices. He hates shopping, for one. However, we both have an uncontrollable and insatiable craving for freshly baked chocolate chip cookies. I came across this less-guiltrecipe on Bethenny’s natural cooking blog. I decided to whip up my own version using what I had in my pantry.

They were delicious, and even husband downed 5 or 6 when they came out of the oven. Read more for the improvised recipe.


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I used:

1 1/2 cups wheat flour
3/4 cups quick-cooking plain oatmeal
1/2 arrowroot powder
(I keep this on-hand for making natural deodorant)
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup raw sugar
1/3 cups Ghiradelli chocolate chips
1 tsp canola or vegetable oil
1/3 cup skim milk
1 mashed banana
1 tsp molasses

You can compare my ingredients to Bethenny’s, and come up with your own variation.

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Start by…

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What I Wish People Knew About Depression

Therese J. Borchard

robin-williamsSomeone recently asked me to write on what I wish people knew about depression, in light of Robin William’s suicide. Here’s my response.

I wish people knew that depression is complex, that it is a physiological condition with psychological and spiritual components, and therefore can’t be forced into any neat and tidy box, that healing needs to come from lots of kinds of sources and that every person’s recovery is different.

I wish people knew the depression doesn’t happen in a vacuum and is part of a intricate web of biological systems (nervous, digestive, endocrine, respiratory), that depression is about the gut as well as the brain, the thyroid and the nerves, that we would have better health in this country if we approached depression with a holistic view.

I wish people understood that untreated depression can increase the risk of developing other illnesses, that a 2007 Norwegian study found…

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On Letting Go of Things We Can’t Change

Therese J. Borchard

CompetitionI met with a new doctor yesterday. I’ve been interviewing them like babysitters lately.

“Do you believe there is such a thing as a mood disorder?” I asked him.

“Yes,” he replied. “At least in language there is.”

“When and why did you decide to break from conventional medicine and practice a more holistic approach?

“Eight or nine years ago. I was tired of looking at the lists of medications people were taking. I couldn’t, in good conscience, prescribe meds to treat the side effects of other meds.”

“Do you believe that manic depressives should stay on their medicine or wean off all synthetic drugs?”

“I think if you’ve had a truly manic experience, it can be dangerous to start weaning off. Each person is different.”

He passed my test. More or less.

This guy is a holistic MD with a license in internal medicine, which means he will prescribe…

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7 Ways to Deal With Family and Friends Who Don’t Get It

Therese J. Borchard

mentalhealthforparentsIf “I believe you” are the three most powerful words you can say to someone with an invisible illness, four of the hardest or most painful words to absorb—whether they are said directly or communicated indirectly through insensitive behavior—are “I don’t believe you.” And yet, people who live with depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders hear them over and over and over again from family members and friends.

“How do you keep from getting resentful?” a reader asked me the other day.

I wish I had four simple instructions to make friends and family comprehend the kind of handicaps that don’t come with a parking spot, or at least, be empathetic toward those that are plagued by them. However, some confusion and ache is inevitable because some people are simply incapable of understanding. Here are a few things that help me to remain a kind, well-adjusted member of society in…

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What I Wish People Knew About Depression

Therese J. Borchard

robin-williamsSomeone recently asked me to write on what I wish people knew about depression, in light of Robin William’s suicide. Here’s my response.

I wish people knew that depression is complex, that it is a physiological condition with psychological and spiritual components, and therefore can’t be forced into any neat and tidy box, that healing needs to come from lots of kinds of sources and that every person’s recovery is different.

I wish people knew the depression doesn’t happen in a vacuum and is part of a intricate web of biological systems (nervous, digestive, endocrine, respiratory), that depression is about the gut as well as the brain, the thyroid and the nerves, that we would have better health in this country if we approached depression with a holistic view.

I wish people understood that untreated depression can increase the risk of developing other illnesses, that a 2007 Norwegian study found…

View original post 1,031 more words